Egg Replacer Guide for Cooking and Baking

 

Egg Replacer Guide for Cooking and Baking 3

One of the most frequent questions I get asked, is about egg replacement. Using a variety of egg replacement options is actually much easier than many people might think. And, while pretty much any of the following egg replacement options will work with baking, not all of them translate as well to your cooking needs. In other words, you probably don’t want to substitute a recipe’s called for eggs with applesauce or mashed banana into your lentil loaf (or regular meatloaf).

Below is a comprehensive egg replacer guide for all your cooking and baking needs.

Ener-G Egg Replacer (works for both cooking and baking needs)

This long-time baking favorite is a simple way to replace eggs in your recipes. Made from potato starch, tapioca flour, and leavening agents, it helps to bind and leaven baked goods. Whisk together 1-1/2 teaspoons with 2 tablespoons warm water until frothy. ALWAYS mix-up your Ener-G egg replacer separately before adding it to your recipe, and I personally let this mixture rest for about 5 minutes to let it fully set-up.

Ground flax seeds (yields a nutty, earthy flavor, so can be used for cooking and selective baking needs)

Egg replacing in baking can be a lot more creative than relying on boxed egg replacer.  Cheap and nutritious, when blended with a little bit of water—three tablespoons of water to one tablespoon of ground flax yields about one “egg”—flax creates a mixture that binds baking ingredients together. Let the flaxseed slurry rest for 5-7 minutes to thicken before use, and ALWAYS mix separately BEFORE adding to a recipe.

Chia seeds (works for both cooking and baking needs)

Chia seeds can be used exactly the same as flaxseed, and I prefer them over flaxseeds for several reasons. They impart zero flavor of their own, so they are great to use for any baking or cooking recipe. Additionally, they don’t spoil as fast as flaxseeds, so you can buy them in larger quantity and keep in your pantry. With flaxseed, once it is ground, it starts to deteriorate pretty fast. For this reason, buy flaxseed whole in smaller quantities and grind them right before use for optimal results and flavor. As with flaxseed, ALWAYS mix your chia seed slurry BEFORE adding it to a recipe, and let it rest for 5-7 minutes to thicken before use.

Bananas (works well for most baking needs and selective cooked dishes that have sweet vegetables and other ingredients)

When making banana bread and other cakes containing bananas, the fruit itself has binding qualities and can stand in as an egg replacer. For every egg you need, simply mash or purée 1/2 banana and stir in 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder.

Tofu (works for both cooking and baking needs)

Always press and dry excess water from tofu before using, even as an egg substitute. For each called for egg, replace with 1/4 cup of mashed tofu.

Gluten Free Bread and Baked Goods Recipes

Additional egg substitute options:

Baking powder & baking soda

1 egg = 1-1/2 tablespoons baking powder + 1-1/2 tablespoons warm water + 1-1/2 tablespoons oil (use = leavening)
1 egg = 1-1/2 tablespoons baking powder + 1 tablespoon warm water + 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar (use = leavening)
1 egg = 2 teaspoons baking soda + 2 tablespoons warm water (use = leavening)
1 egg = 2 teaspoons baking soda + 2 tablespoons warm water + 1/2 teaspoon oil (use = leavening)
1 egg = 1 teaspoon baking powder + 1 teaspoon vinegar (use = leavening)

Flour

1 egg = 1 teaspoon soy flour + 1 tablespoon water (use = binding + moisture)
1 egg = 3 tablespoons water + 3 tablespoons flour + 1-1/2 teaspoons vegetable shortening, + 1/2 teaspoon baking powder (use = leavening)

Fruit

1 egg = 1/4 cup applesauce or puréed fruit (use = binding and moisture)
1 egg = 1/4 cup pumpkin purée or squash purée (use = binding and moisture)
1 egg = 1/4 cup apricot or prune purée (use = binding and moisture)

Nuts & seeds

1 egg = 3 tablespoons nut butter
1 egg = 1 teaspoon psyllium seed husk + 1/4 cup water (let stand 5 mintues; use = binding and moisture)

Soy

1 egg = 1-1/2 tablespoons lecithin granules + 1-1/2 tablespoons water + 1 teaspoon baking powder (use = leavening)
1 egg = 1/4 cup silken tofu (use = binding and moisture)

Starch

1 egg = 2 tablespoons arrowroot + 1 tablespoon water (use: binding and moisture)
1 egg = 2 tablespoons corn starch + 1 tablespoon water (use: binding and moisture)
1 egg = 2 tablespoons potato starch + 1 tablespoon water (use: binding and moisture)
1 egg = 1-1/2 teaspoon tapioca/corn starch + 1-1/2 teaspoon potato starch + 1/8 teaspoon baking powder + pinch xanthan gum + 3-1/2 tablespoons water + 1 teaspoon oil (whisk to froth; use = leavening)

Other

1 egg = 1 teaspoon yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water (use = leavening)
1 egg = 3 tablespoons vegetable oil + 1 tablespoon water (use = moisture and binding)
1 egg = 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise (use = moisture and binding)
1 egg = 3 tablespoons mashed beans (use = moisture and binding)
1 egg = 3 tablespoons mashed potatoes (use = moisture and binding)

Egg white substitution

1 egg white = 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum + 1/4 cup water (let stand 5 minutes, then whip; use = leavening)

Egg yolk substitution

1 egg = 1-1/2 tablespoons lecithin granules + 2 teaspoons water (use = moisture and binding)

Bon Veggie Appetit!
Gina “The Veggie Goddess” Matthews